Monthly Archives: February 2013

All About Attitude

It’s all about attitude. Head up. Think positively.

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Things we all hear or say at one point or another in our everyday lives. Attitude becomes especially important when you are in the public eye, like many authors today are. Your attitude directly effects how people think of you. No question about it.

So, what happens when one of those people in the public eyes – author, actor, what have you – shows a disturbingly poor attitude about trifle things, such as criticisms?

This past week, my classmates and I were asked to read various articles and blog posts about reviewing books (for say Amazon, and such). While many of them passed by in a whirlwind of disjointed words, there was one that stuck to me.

It was a blog post by a woman named Corey Ann who had reviewed a book by Emily Giffin. After some pretty unjustified drama started between another reviewer and Giffin’s husband on Amazon, Corey Ann went in and changed her review from a four star to a one star review, because she could not, on good faith, recommend this book to others. Fair enough, right? Well, Giffin fans didn’t think so. The onslaught of insults and threats were unbelievable. Even though the author herself wasn’t involved in the drama war on Amazon, never once did she issue an apology on behalf of her fans (who were sending death threats by this time), and at one point even said that Corey Ann was enjoying the drama. Completely unbelievable. Yes, I’m sure everyone wants to come home to death threats on their answering machine over some book review (oh, a little sarcasm dripped through there). You can read more about it here.

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Such poor attitudes on everyone’s parts just completely boggled my mind. When I finished I thought: Well, there’s another author I’ll never read.

I mean, no one is by any means “perfect.” But, come on. When someone in the public eye acts with such poor attitude, they can’t really expect people to just overlook it. I’m sure a lot of people still remember the whole Brooke Shields versus Tom Cruise mess ( I know, actors and authors are sometimes like apples and oranges, but still – poor attitude in play), as well as the mess with Mel Gibson a few years ago and of course all of Charlie Sheen’s lovely little tirades.

After reading Corey Ann’s poor ordeal, I’m kind of down on this whole reviewing books thing. I definitely have my opinions, as do many people, and I’m not opposed to to giving them, but I really don’t want death threats left on my voicemail. It’s just really not how I want to spend my day. So, then why should I or anyone else for that matter?

Attitude. In the end, that’s what matters in a lot of things. It affects your jobs, future endeavors, and how your friends and family see you.

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The Unappreciated…

Hello, all!

First, I must get this off my chest. I am a huge fan of the television show “Supernatural” and am pleased to inform you all that it has been renewed for a ninth season! For a show that wasn’t supposed to progress past it’s fifth season, it’s still going strong. You should all go out an watch it if you’re into that kind of stuff (ghosts, legends, demons vs angels, etc). The first seven seasons are available on Netflix Instant Play.

Okay, now on to the unappreciated, because let’s face it – Supernatural is obviously not unappreciated by a long shot.

Firstly, I found a single copy of some random British book entitled “Frozen Fire” at a little nothing kind of a book store in my hometown, which is smaller than most. Anyway, despite the fact that it’s obviously not geared towards readers outside of the London area, it is a fascinating tale, not weighed down by romance and such.  However, just because of a fact like that, it’s an unappreciated, incredibly intriguing tale that has only 325 reviews on Goodreads. Compared to Twilight’s insanely high 77,000+ reviews, it seems like an insignificant number. I implore you, if you enjoy a good mystery or adventure, give the book a chance.

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Now, onto the unappreciated movie I found this weekend. Always adding random movies and television shows to the Instant Play feature on Netflix, I pick ones that sound interesting, no matter if I know the cast/crew or not. This time there was a movie named “From Time To Time” with Maggie Smith. Absolutely enchanting. Couldn’t have asked for a better surprise. I advise you all to go out an watch it. Once again, it’s something with a little mystery, intrigue, and adventure. Extremely imaginative and enchanting, but then again Maggie Smith picks her movies well.

So, here it is. The next time you’re walking through a bookstore/library, or are flipping through the channels (Netflix, OnDemand, etc) stop and take a chance on something you’ve never heard of, because you could be completely enchanted with it.

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Pink is for Girls, Blue is for Boys

Pink is for girls, blue is for boys…something we’ve all heard or thought at one point or another, right? I’ll admit I used to think that, until I had a blue room, then I thought I was a rebel. But what is with these stereotypes, that certain things are for boys only and others are for girls only? Currently, one of my classes is dealing with the idea of stereotypes when it comes to reading (specifically, when it comes to reading comics), and it got me thinking: How many people actually fit into these stereotypes?

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We were assigned a couple of readings about manga comics and throughout the entire reading, the idea kept coming up that comics are for men. Then, one of my classmates explained that because it’s written mostly by men, mostly men read it. But is that really true? In my head this explanation translated to: comics, adventure, horror, etc are for boys and girls should stick to romance. It’s thought that I’m supposed to be reading romance, instead of secretly snuggling up with horror books. Where do we get these ideas, anyway? Just because most romance books are written by women means that women are supposed to read them?

Some of my favorite authors are men (Stephen King, JM Barrie, Michael J Fox, etc) and my favorite female authors wrote books with male leads (JK Rowling, SE Hinton, etc), so what does that say about me? Does anyone actually fit into these stereotypes? I know I sure don’t.

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