Oh, the horror…

So, one of my favorite authors of all time is Stephen King: The Master of Horror. I’ve written term/research papers on him, I’ve read/watched anything he’s produced, and I’ve started collecting first edition copies of his books. Today, however, I find myself steering towards whatever he writes, whether it be short stories, novels, or screenplays.

In my last post, I talked about how I tend to devour books. However, when it comes to the works of King, I find myself taking my time to let everything soak through me (I still burn through the books faster than most people though). Stephen King has been scaring America for most of his life with the fantastically spooky worlds he spins. Sadly, it’s because of this fondness for King’s stories that has caused so many of his stories to be flashed up onto the big screen (or the TV in the cases where he didn’t want to cut the times down to a suitable amount). And now that Hollywood seems to be losing it’s creative flare, more and more of his stories keep getting optioned, and it’s starting to get a little tiring, annoying, etc.

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What’s wrong with the original movies? We’re going onto the third releasing of “Carrie,” adapted from King’s novel Carrie, the second releasing of “IT” (which isn’t even keeping true to the story), and the second releasing of “The Stand.” Sissy Spacek, John Ritter, Tim Curry, and Gary Sinese did fantastic jobs in these movies, just leave well enough alone.

Now, I know other movies based off of his books have more than one edition, but in all fairness…He called for those, like with The Shining. I’m sorry, but Stanley Kubrick butchered that story. The Twins? Never mentioned. Jack Nickolson’s death? Kubrick’s imagination running wild. Scatman Crothers’ death by axe? Never happened, didn’t even have an axe in the book. The reason this infuriates me is because when directors decide to take these stories and mutilate them, and then every time I go to read those stories, I have to block out the memories of the movies in order to fully enjoy it. All the remakes are just starting to get nauseating when I go to read a good book. I wonder if I’m the only one this bothered by the issue.

Stephen King once said, “Books are a uniquely portable magic.” I find this to be very true, but I’s becoming more and more difficult to keep the horror of Hollywood at bay while I enter these magical worlds.

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7 Comments

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7 responses to “Oh, the horror…

  1. I’m a pretty big Stephen King fan myself. It’s also hard to capture Stephen King on film, regardless of if the director butchers it!

    • I agree. But for some reason, I feel like if Stephen King has his name on it – whether it be director, producer, screenwriter, etc – the stories always end up truer to form.

      • Definitely. It’s always good to have the source around to ask, “Now how exactly am I supposed to film that.”

      • Exactly. Especially when a director wants to move a story from flashes of 1958 and 1989/90 to flashes of 1985 and present. Apparently, the new director for “IT” thinks it would be “fun” to shoot the movie between the 80s and present day. That effects the story in so many ways and now the thought of that film will creep up whenever I go to read the story.

      • This is terrible news! I actually had no idea this was happening…
        Perhaps I can pretend it’s not. Though I doubt it. šŸ™‚

      • I’ve been trying to do that for the past year, ever since the director released the awful news, and it hasn’t worked. I wish it would, but at least I can be happy with the fact that production seems to have been paused, considering there’s no cast, barely a crew, and no release date. šŸ™‚

  2. Personally: I would rather have an adaptation of my work NOT be faithful to the book if by being faithful, that adaptation fails to engage an audience. I need the adaptation to help me find more readers. You’re only looking at this from the pov of a fan. You have to look at it from the pov of a writer, too. King can feel however he wants to feel–he has plenty of readers. Most writers cannot afford to give their adapters ultimatums or direction.

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